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A couple revealed how they have sold their family home to raise enough money to move to the Seychelles and set up an environmental charity

por Britney Burnside (02/07/2020)


A couple revealed how they have sold their family home to raise enough money to move to the Seychelles and set up an environmental charity.  

Karolina and Barry Seath, 47, are leaving Putney, south-west London, for Moyenne Island, a tiny 400m-long island nature reserve off the north coast of Mahé. 

The intrepid couple are planning to set up a coral farm to repopulate the reef which has been left barren as a result of climate change and human actions. 

They are taking their daughters Georgina, 11, and Josephine, seven, who will travel 15 minutes by boat to attend school on another island. 

Karolina and Barry Seath, 47, are leaving Putney, south-west London, for Moyenne Island, a tiny 400m-Tour du thuyền Hạ Long giá rẻ island nature reserve off the north coast of Mahé.

Pictured, the couple on holiday with their daughters Georgina, 11, and Josephine, seven, who are also moving 

The intrepid couple are planning to set up a coral farm off the coast of Moyenne, pictured, to repopulate the reef which has been left barren as a result of climate change and human action

Barry, a former recruitment consultant and policeman, said: 'We are just a normal husband, wife, and two kids, living the sort of life that most others do.

'But we both felt the need to make a positive change for ourselves, our children and the world we had largely taken for granted.

'So we have sold our home and parted company with most of our worldly possessions.'

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Barry has spent more than 15 years running a London recruitment firm but will now work full time as a volunteer for his family's charity, Coral Reef Conservation UK. Karolina, 37, who is originally from Poland, will manage the charity's social media presence. 

The couple, who have saved enough money to support the family for two years, will also divide responsibilities including offering educational tours to tourists and local school children.

Speaking on the move, Josephine said: 'I'll miss my friends, but I'm really looking forward to seeing lots of different animals and doing lots of snorkelling and helping my dad look after the coral.'

Sisters Georgina, 11, and Josephine, seven, who will travel 15 minutes by boat to attend school on another island.

Pictured, the schoolgirls jump for joy on a family holiday

Georgina wants to learn to dive to assist the project, and added: 'I'm really excited to have this opportunity to move abroad and learn more about the world. I hope we can make a real difference.'

Barry explained they were spurred into action after witnessing the damage to the coral reef first-hand on family holidays to the Seychelles.   

'Every time we visited we noticed the coral was getting worse and worse,' he said.

'All the tourists say the same thing.

They love the beaches, but are really disappointed with the coral. They expect these lush coral reefs, but what they actually find is lots of coral rubble.'

Coronavirus has devastated the Seychelles' economy. The tourism sector, which represents around 50 per cent of the country's GDP, has effectively frozen.

The family hopes that replenishing the coral reefs will help boost future visitor numbers to the country.

They were due to fly out at the end of August and are hoping flights will return to normal in time for them to depart as planned. 

In 2012 Moyenne was designated the world's smallest National Park after its only inhabitant, British expat Brendon Grimshaw, died.

Pictured, the sign greeting visitors to the island

The coral farm will be only the second in the world, with the first being on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.